DFW Skin Surgery Center
1115 W. Randol Mill Rd
Suite 200
 Arlington, TX 76012
(817) 303-6647 (MOHS)
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DFW Skin Surgery Center, PLLC
1115 W. Randol Mill Road, Suite 200, Arlington, TX 76012
(817) 303-6647 (MOHS)
Fax: (817) 303-6651


©2012-2017 DFW Skin Surgery Center, PLLC. All Rights Reserved.

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Skin Cancer
Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer and accounts for around 75-80% of all skin cancers. It is most often found on sun-exposed areas of the face, ears, scalp, neck, and upper trunk. Although its appearance may vary, basal cell carcinoma often looks like a shiny bump or a non-healing wound, which bleeds with minimal trauma. While basal cell carcinomas rarely spread, or metastasize, to other areas of the body, they are often very locally destructive, especially on the face and the ears.
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Cancer is a condition, in which cells that make up a tissue or an organ begin to grow out of control. While normally, the process of cell growth, division, and eventual cell death is highly regulated in the body, cancer, or malignant, cells are able to evade such regulation. 

By far the largest contributor to the formation of cancer in the skin is ultraviolet radiation, such as that from the sun or tanning beds. Additional factors include suppressed immune function, such as that seen in organ transplant patients and patients with hematological malignancies, chronic wounds, burn scars, radiation exposure, and exposure to various cancer-causing chemicals, also known as carcinogens. Some patients may also have genetic, or familial, predisposition to skin cancer.  

Various types of cancer arise from different cells or structures within the skin. The most common types include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma.

What is Skin Cancer?
Though potentially the most dangerous one, malignant melanoma accounts for less than 5% of all skin cancers. Melanoma may occur on sun-exposed or, occasionally, sun-protected areas and may arise within existing moles or as a new lesion. Over the years, a set of criteria, known as “ABCDE’s”, have been developed to try to distinguish between benign moles and malignant melanoma. If diagnosed early, melanoma is often curable; however, delayed diagnosis may lead to distant metastases and is associated with much lower cure rates. Continuing research and recent advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma may offer new therapeutic options for this condition.
Malignant Melanoma
Lesions suspicious for skin cancer are sampled, or biopsied, for microscopic examination. If a skin cancer is confirmed, a number of therapeutic options may be available, depending on the type of cancer, its location, and other factors. 

Mohs micrographic surgery is the most advanced and effective treatment option for a large variety of skin cancers. Dr. Berlin, a fellowship-trained Mohs surgeon, will be able to discuss in detail this and other potential therapeutic techniques most appropriate for your specific condition. If you would like to schedule a personal consultation with Dr. Berlin, please contact our office today.

Treatment of Skin Cancer
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common type of skin cancer. In addition to the sun-exposed body sites described above, it can sometimes also arise on the lower lip and the genitals. In addition, its incidence is drastically increased in immunosuppressed patients. Squamous cell carcinomas often start as a “pre-cancer”, a reddish or tan rough patch known as actinic keratosis, and progress to a thick, scaly, non-healing bump. Squamous cell carcinoma carries a higher risk of distant spread, or metastasis, as compared to the basal cell carcinoma.